Can You File Chapter 13 After Chapter 7?
Multiple Bankruptcies

There is nothing prohibiting a person from undertaking multiple bankruptcies. If you have already gone through bankruptcy and find yourself in financial difficulties again, you already know some of the advantages that filing bankruptcy brings. While there are no limits on the number of bankruptcies you can file, there are time frames you need to be aware of. It’s also important to know that these time frames apply to bankruptcy cases that have been discharged, not those that have been dismissed.

Successive Same Chapter Filings

A Chapter 7 bankruptcy can be done and dusted in three to six months with all unsecured debt eliminated. If you have previously filed Chapter 7, eight years must elapse from the date of filing in order for you to file another Chapter 7. In Chapter 13 bankruptcy your unsecured debt may be eliminated or substantially reduced. It is possible for you to file another Chapter 13 bankruptcy after two years. Given that the first Chapter 13 plan would still be in place, it would be wise to consult with one of the experienced bankruptcy attorneys at Burr Law before doing so.

Chapter 13 Then Chapter 7

Typically, you can file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy six years after the filing date of your Chapter 13. That time frame can be shorter if you paid your unsecured creditors in full or if you paid at least 70% of the claims and it represented your best efforts. You will need to meet the income status requirement for Chapter 7 as well.

Chapter 7 Then Chapter 13

Four years after the filing date of your Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you can file for Chapter 13. This is sometimes known informally as a Chapter 20, though that can refer to filing a Chapter 13 immediately after a Chapter 7 (or while it is still pending). When you file a Chapter 13 after a Chapter 7 without waiting four years, you cannot receive a discharge in the Chapter 13 but there are some advantages. In Wisconsin, though, courts rarely allow the filing of Chapter 13 earlier than the four year time limit. If the four years has elapsed, then it is perfectly acceptable to file Chapter 13. That will protect your home and car, eliminate or significantly reduce unsecured debt, and give you time to deal with nondischargeable debts.

Multiple Bankruptcies and Automatic Stays

It’s important for you to know that if your initial bankruptcy case is dismissed rather than discharged, there are implications for the next bankruptcy you file (whatever Chapter it is under). If you file within a year of the filing of the first bankruptcy, and that first bankruptcy was dismissed, the automatic stay that prevents creditors from pursuing all collection action will be limited to 30 days only. Usually it is for the duration of the bankruptcy proceedings. The time limit is based on the assumption that the second filing is done in bad faith, so it is possible to request the bankruptcy court to extend it beyond the 30 days. You would need to demonstrate your good faith to the court for that to happen. In the event that you file three bankruptcies within a year, the automatic stay is voided in the third instance.

Bankruptcy is a complicated legal situation. Multiple bankruptcies present even more intricacies. If you are considering a subsequent bankruptcy, it is vital that you have expert advice. With Burr Law, you have access to the finest bankruptcy attorneys, all of whom are experts on Wisconsin bankruptcy law.

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